Iraq’s state grain buyer is seeking 30,000 tonnes of rice of any origin

  • CHICAGO, Oct 3 (Reuters) - The following is a snapshot of global export markets for grains, oilseeds and edible oils as reported by government and private sources as of the close of business on Tuesday: WHEAT PURCHASE: Egypt's state grain buyer GASC said it bought 180,000 tonnes of Russian wheat in a tender. Traders said prices ranged from $197.95 to $200.00 per tonne free on board (FOB). GASC received offers from 11 suppliers, a jump from its previous tender when suppliers stayed away amid a simmering trade row over tough inspections. BARLEY PURCHASE: Jordan's state grain buyer purchased 50,000 tonnes of barley in a tender, a government source and traders said. The barley was purchased from GTCS at the price of $218 a tonne cost and freight, the sources said. The arrival date is the second half of December. DURUM WHEAT AND BARLEY PURCHASE: Tunisia bought 100,000 tonnes of durum wheat and 25,000 tonnes of feed barley in a tender on Tuesday, European traders said. It paid for the durum wheat between $286.29 to $289.69 per tonne, cost and freight included, and the feed barley at $209.55 a tonne C&F, they said. The grains were of optional origin and for shipment between November and December depending on the origin accepted. WHEAT TENDER: Japan's Ministry of Agriculture is seeking to buy a total of 109,906 tonnes of food-quality wheat from the United States and Canada in a regular tender that will close late on Oct. 5. PENDING TENDERS: SOYMEAL: Iranian state-owned animal feed importer SLAL issued an international tender to purchase about 200,000 tonnes of soymeal, European traders said. Offers in the tender were to be submitted on Oct. 2. The soymeal can be sourced from Argentina or Brazil only and prices must be submitted in euros. WHEAT TENDER: Iraq's state grain buyer is seeking 50,000 tonnes of wheat in a tender, Baghdad-based traders said. The deadline for offers is Oct. 16 and offers must remain valid until Oct. 22, the sources said. Iraq is seeking wheat of U.S., Canadian and Australian origins, at the seller's option. RICE TENDER: Iraq's state grain buyer is seeking 30,000 tonnes of rice of any origin, traders said. The deadline for the offers is Oct. 16 and offers should remain valid until Oct. 22, they said.
  • Pakistani rice lowest offer in Iraq’s 30,000 T tender

  • HAMBURG, Aug 28 (Reuters) - The lowest price offer in the tender from Iraq's state grains buyer to purchase at least 30,000 tonnes of rice was $416 a tonne c&f free out for rice to be sourced from Pakistan, traders said on Monday. No decision about a purchase was believed to have been made in the tender which closed on Sunday, Aug. 27, with offers remaining valid up to Thursday, Aug. 31. The offer was made for 40,000 tonnes from Pakistan, they said. This was followed by an offer of 40,000 tonnes rice from Thailand at $420.45 a tonne c&f free out. Other offers for Thai rice were made at prices from $422.70 to $457 a tonne c&f free out. The lowest offer for rice from the United States was $660 a tonne free out for 30,000 tonnes. Indian rice was offered lowest at $574 a tonne c&f free out. Rice from Uruguay was offered lowest at $580.50 a tonne, Brazilian rice at $584 and Argentine rice at $579 all c&f free out. Volumes in Iraq's tenders are nominal and the country can buy more than requested in the tender. Iraq made no purchase in its previous international tender to buy rice which closed on July 30. The country has been struggling to import grain for its food subsidy programme after introducing new payment and quality terms that left trading houses unwilling to participate in its international tenders. Iraq is expected to produce about 250,000 tonnes of rice this year, suggesting the country will face a shortfall of about 1 million tonnes which will need to be covered by imports. (Reporting by Michael Hogan, editing by David Evans)
  • Iraq seeking 30,000 tonnes of rice in purchase tender

  • BAGHDAD, Aug 20 (Reuters) - Iraq's state grain buyer has issued an international tender to buy 30,000 tonnes of rice, a government source said on Sunday. The deadline for offers is Aug. 27 and rice is being sought from all origins, the source said. Offers should remain valid until Aug. 31. Iraq made no purchase in its previous attempt to buy rice, which closed on July 30. The country has been struggling to import grain for its food subsidy programme after introducing new payment and quality terms that left trading houses unwilling to participate in its international tenders. Iraq is expected to produce about 250,000 tonnes of rice this year, suggesting that there will be a shortfall of about 1 million tonnes that will need to be covered by imports. (Writing by Maha El Dahan; Editing by David Goodman)
  • Thailand-origin offered lowest in Iraq’s 30,000 T rice tender

  • HAMBURG: The lowest price offer in the tender from Iraq's state grains buyer to purchase at least 30,000 tonnes of rice was $498.20 a tonne c&f free out for rice to be sourced from Thailand, European traders said on Monday. No decision about a purchase was believed to have been made in the tender, which closed on June 11 with offers remaining valid up to June 15. The lowest price was followed by another offer of Thailand rice at $503.20 a tonne c&f free out. Lowest offer for rice from the United States was $595 a tonne free out. Indian rice was offered lowest at $525 a tonne c&f liner out. Free out and liner out terms have differing conditions for the cost of port cargo handling. Argentine rice was offered lowest at $537 a tonne c&f free out and Uruguay origin was offered lowest at $539 a tonne c&f free out, they said. Brazilian rice was offered lowest at $552 a tonne c&f free out. Traders said six trading companies took part in the tender, lower than usual but still a reasonable number. Iraq has been struggling to import grain for its food subsidy programme after introducing new payment and quality terms which left trading houses unwilling to participate in its international tenders. Iraq told suppliers earlier this year it would pay for its grain in instalments. Traders said they were informed by Iraq's Grain Board that low oil prices and other financial factors were forcing the country to delay payments. Iraq had made no purchase in a separate wheat tender, traders said on Monday.