MP govt and APEDA in Basmati rice geographical indication registry row

  • The geographical indication (GI) registry over Basmati rice has sparked a row between the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) and the Madhya Pradesh government, following the latter’s application for the GI registry of the central Indian state for Basmati rice production.  B M Sahare, additional director, ministry of agriculture, government of Madhya Pradesh, said, “Thirteen or fourteen districts of the state are currently producing Basmati rice.”  “There is a formidable basis for our application, and even the GI Registry, which is based in Chennai, has recognised our claim. But this was challenged in the court, and the matter is now sub judice,” he added. Sahare stated that the state government applied for GI Registry after conducting several of the mandatory tests at accredited laboratories to prove the claim.  However, a senior official dealing with the issue stated that APEDA’s position was open and clear. Only seven states are a part of the GI registry for Basmati Rice, and the authority will oppose any move to include any other state for it. APEDA also fears that this will open a Pandora’s box, and Pakistan and China can also claim the GI tag for Basmati rice.  Currently, eleven districts in Pakistan, under a treaty with India, enjoy GI registry for Basmati rice.  India, meanwhile, has a 85 per cent share in the global basmati rice trade. It exported basmati rice worth Rs 21,604 crore in 2016-17. In a previous statement, the ministry of commerce and industries reported in Parliament that the National Agricultural Research System, under the ministry of agriculture and cooperation has recognised only the states of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Delhi and Uttarakhand, the western part of Uttar Pradesh and two districts of Jammu and Kashmir (namely, Jammu and Kathua) as the traditional geographical indication for Basmati rice cultivation. This means that the basmati rice produced in these regions are considered an intellectual property and will be acknowledged as Basmati rice, while the Basmati rice produced in other places will not be considered Basmati rice, as APEDA does not consider areas other than those with the GI tag for Basmati rice production.
  • Going against the grain when it comes to white rice

  • Nutrition experts say when it comes to diabetes and weight management, the decision to eliminate white rice from your diet is not always so clear-cut. — Reuters pic SINGAPORE, June 4 — White rice is a common staple on most dinner tables here. However, the starchy grain has gained a bad reputation ever since local health authorities singled it out last year as one of the top concerns in the nation’s battle against diabetes. Diabetes risk rises 11 per cent for every daily serving of white rice, according to a meta-analysis by the Harvard School of Public Health published in the British Medical Journal. Replacing it with wholegrain options (like brown or red rice) may cut diabetes risk, and Singapore’s Health Promotion Board (HPB) recommends consuming wholegrains instead of refined grains wherever possible. But nutrition experts say when it comes to diabetes and weight management, the answer is not always so clear-cut. White is bad, brown is good? While Asians are genetically more predisposed to Type 2 diabetes than Caucasians, principal dietitian at Raffles Diabetes and Endocrine Centre Bibi Chia pointed out that in the past, obesity and diabetes were not public health issues although previous generations probably consumed more white rice than most people do today. “We can’t just blame rice. It’s also about what you’re eating the entire day — how much fat, excessive sugar, processed food, deep-fried food — as well as the lower amount of physical activity people are doing these days. Rising obesity rates mean that more people are also developing insulin resistance,” said Chia at the media launch of Kinmemai Better White and Better Brown rice earlier this month. The Japanese-crafted healthier rice products, processed using a gentler rice-buffing technique that retains more fibre and nutrients, will be available in Singapore next month, offering more options for healthier rice.  The main reason white rice gets a bad rap is due to its high glycaemic index (GI), which is a measure of how rapidly a starchy food affects blood sugar after it is digested. A value of 55 or less is considered a low GI rating, while 70 or above is considered high, said Dr Iain Brownlee, director of operations for food and human nutrition at Newcastle University (Singapore). High GI foods cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels, which over time, could raise Type 2 diabetes risk. Some preliminary research has also linked high GI diets to other conditions like colorectal cancer and age-related macular degeneration. For diabetics, prolonged high blood sugar levels can also lead to life-threatening complications as their bodies are unable to effectively manage them, said Dr Brownlee. Nutrition-wise, white rice also pales in comparison to wholegrain varieties as its hull, bran and germ, the outer part which contains most of the fibre, B-vitamins and other nutrients, are removed. The polishing process leaves only the endosperm, which contains mainly starch and some protein. On the other hand, wholegrain rice like brown rice, which retains its germ and bran, has a lower GI and almost five times the fibre of white rice. This keeps a person fuller and blood sugar levels stable over a longer period, making it a recommended choice from the perspective of weight and diabetes management, said Riddhi Naidu, a clinical dietitian at HealthQuay Medical. Processing, cooking methods, and portion sizes matter too However, Dr Brownlee said it is not always possible to accurately predict the GI of different types of rice as many factors can affect its digestibility. While wholegrain varieties like brown rice will provide a wider range of nutrients, some may not necessarily be lower in GI than white rice. For one, the processing methods and conditions in which the rice is grown can impact the GI of rice varieties, he added. Other factors such as cooking methods and how the rice is eaten can also affect its GI value, said Naidu. For example, a bowl of rice porridge has a higher GI than plain rice as the longer cooking time breaks down the cellular structure, making it easier to digest and raises blood sugar levels. Chia added while replacing a portion of white rice with brown rice lowers its GI, the common habit of upsizing one’s rice portion can raise the GI even when consuming wholegrains. The HPB recommends that wholegrains like brown rice form at most a quarter of a plate at every meal. “A lot of hawker fare don’t come with adequate vegetables. When you have just two slices of cucumber with your chicken rice, you’ll have to eat more chicken and rice to feel full,” said Chia. “Another common mistake is to eat rice with a lot of gravy, which increases the carbohydrate, calorie, salt and fat content of the meal.” Low GI may not always be healthier The experts stressed that it is also important to note that the food’s GI value does not indicate its nutritional value. Take rice fried in a copious amount of oil. When combined with carbohydrates, fat tends to lower the GI of the food as it slows down digestion, but it does not mean the fried item is a healthier option, said Naidu.  Besides eating right, practising portion control is crucial in managing blood glucose levels and weight. “Having low GI rice does not mean you can have more of it. If you dislike brown rice, you may choose to have parboiled or basmati rice, which are lower in GI than conventional white rice varieties,” said Naidu. Finally, it is also important to get moving for at least 15 minutes after every meal to manage blood sugar levels, added Chia. Know your rice The demand for healthier rice options has risen in recent years. NTUC FairPrice’s director of grocery products Victor Chai said this year, the chain has seen a 25 per cent growth in demand for healthier rice products such as unpolished brown rice, red rice, mixed rice and organic rice compared to the same period last year. It currently offers about 30 different rice products considered to be healthier. Riddhi Naidu, clinical dietitian at HealthQuay Medical, gives the low-down on the nutritional content and glycaemic index (GI) value of the different rice varieties. White rice The hull, bran and germ are removed, hence, it is lower in nutritional value and is easier to digest. But not all white rice has a high GI. For instance, long-grain varieties like basmati have a lower GI (under 70) than short grain options (above 70). Brown rice The germ and bran, an outer shell that is full of fibre, B-vitamins and other minerals, are retained. It contains almost five times the fibre of white rice and takes longer to digest, keeping one’s blood sugar levels stable over a longer period. Red rice Contains a variety of anthocyanins that gives its bran a red or maroon colour. It has a similar amount of fibre as brown rice, but six times the amount of zinc. Parboiled rice Also called converted rice, this type of rice has a lower GI (40) and a firmer and less sticky texture than regular white rice. It is also more nutritious because its processing method — pressure-steamed and dried — forces the nutrients and vitamins (fibre, B-vitamins and minerals) from the husk into the starch granule. Black rice Its black-coloured bran layer comes from a unique anthocyanin combination, which causes the rice to turn a deep purple colour when cooked. It contains about three times the fibre of brown rice. Wild rice Not a true rice, but comes from a wild North American grain-producing grass. Compared to brown rice, it contains a similar amount of fibre but twice the amount of zinc and eight times the amount of Vitamin E. It requires the most water, soaking and cooking time among other rice types.  GI of rice varieties: High (70-100): white rice, sticky (glutinous), puffed rice Medium (56-69): brown rice, basmati rice Low: parboiled (converted) rice (around 40) — TODAY
  • Going against the grain when it comes to white rice

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    Going against the grain when it comes to white rice
    Reuters file photo
    SINGAPORE — White rice is a common staple on most dinner tables here. However, the starchy grain has gained a bad reputation ever since local health authorities singled it out last year as one of the top concerns in the nation’s battle against diabetes. Diabetes risk rises 11 per cent for every daily serving of white rice, according to a meta-analysis by the Harvard School of Public Health published in the British Medical Journal. Replacing it with wholegrain options (like brown or red rice) may cut diabetes risk, and Singapore’s Health Promotion Board (HPB) recommends consuming wholegrains instead of refined grains wherever possible. 
     
    But nutrition experts say when it comes to diabetes and weight management, the answer is not always so clear-cut.  WHITE IS BAD, BROWN IS GOOD? While Asians are genetically more predisposed to Type 2 diabetes than Caucasians, principal dietitian at Raffles Diabetes and Endocrine Centre Bibi Chia pointed out that in the past, obesity and diabetes were not public health issues although previous generations probably consumed more white rice than most people do today.  “We can’t just blame rice. It’s also about what you’re eating the entire day — how much fat, excessive sugar, processed food, deep-fried food — as well as the lower amount of physical activity people are doing these days. Rising obesity rates mean that more people are also developing insulin resistance,” said Ms Chia at the media launch of Kinmemai Better White and Better Brown rice earlier this month.  The Japanese-crafted healthier rice products, processed using a gentler rice-buffing technique that retains more fibre and nutrients, will be available in Singapore next month, offering more options for healthier rice.   The main reason white rice gets a bad rap is due to its high glycaemic index (GI), which is a measure of how rapidly a starchy food affects blood sugar after it is digested.  A value of 55 or less is considered a low GI rating, while 70 or above is considered high, said Dr Iain Brownlee, director of operations for food and human nutrition at Newcastle University (Singapore).  High GI foods cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels, which over time, could raise Type 2 diabetes risk. Some preliminary research has also linked high GI diets to other conditions like colorectal cancer and age-related macular degeneration.  For diabetics, prolonged high blood sugar levels can also lead to life-threatening complications as their bodies are unable to effectively manage them, said Dr Brownlee.  Nutrition-wise, white rice also pales in comparison to wholegrain varieties as its hull, bran and germ, the outer part which contains most of the fibre, B-vitamins and other nutrients, are removed.  The polishing process leaves only the endosperm, which contains mainly starch and some protein.  On the other hand, wholegrain rice like brown rice, which retains its germ and bran, has a lower GI and almost five times the fibre of white rice. This keeps a person fuller and blood sugar levels stable over a longer period, making it a recommended choice from the perspective of weight and diabetes management, said Ms Riddhi Naidu, a clinical dietitian at HealthQuay Medical.  PROCESSING, COOKING METHODS, AND PORTION SIZES MATTER TOO However, Dr Brownlee said it is not always possible to accurately predict the GI of different types of rice as many factors can affect its digestibility.  While wholegrain varieties like brown rice will provide a wider range of nutrients, some may not necessarily be lower in GI than white rice.  For one, the processing methods and conditions in which the rice is grown can impact the GI of rice varieties, he added. Other factors such as cooking methods and how the rice is eaten can also affect its GI value, said Ms Naidu.  For example, a bowl of rice porridge has a higher GI than plain rice as the longer cooking time breaks down the cellular structure, making it easier to digest and raises blood sugar levels.  Ms Chia added while replacing a portion of white rice with brown rice lowers its GI, the common habit of upsizing one’s rice portion can raise the GI even when consuming wholegrains. The HPB recommends that wholegrains like brown rice form at most a quarter of a plate at every meal.  “A lot of hawker fare don’t come with adequate vegetables. When you have just two slices of cucumber with your chicken rice, you’ll have to eat more chicken and rice to feel full,” said Ms Chia.  “Another common mistake is to eat rice with a lot of gravy, which increases the carbohydrate, calorie, salt and fat content of the meal.”  LOW GI MAY NOT ALWAYS BE HEALTHIER The experts stressed that it is also important to note that the food’s GI value does not indicate its nutritional value.  Take rice fried in a copious amount of oil. When combined with carbohydrates, fat tends to lower the GI of the food as it slows down digestion, but it does not mean the fried item is a healthier option, said Ms Naidu.   Besides eating right, practising portion control is crucial in managing blood glucose levels and weight.  “Having low GI rice does not mean you can have more of it. If you dislike brown rice, you may choose to have parboiled or basmati rice, which are lower in GI than conventional white rice varieties,” said Ms Naidu. Finally, it is also important to get moving for at least 15 minutes after every meal to manage blood sugar levels, added Ms Chia. KNOW YOUR RICE The demand for healthier rice options has risen in recent years. NTUC FairPrice’s director of grocery products Victor Chai said this year, the chain has seen a 25 per cent growth in demand for healthier rice products such as unpolished brown rice, red rice, mixed rice and organic rice compared to the same period last year.  It currently offers about 30 different rice products considered to be healthier.  Ms Riddhi Naidu, clinical dietitian at HealthQuay Medical, gives the low-down on the nutritional content and glycaemic index (GI) value of the different rice varieties.  White rice The hull, bran and germ are removed, hence, it is lower in nutritional value and is easier to digest. But not all white rice has a high GI. For instance, long-grain varieties like basmati have a lower GI (under 70) than short grain options (above 70).  Brown rice  The germ and bran, an outer shell that is full of fibre, B-vitamins and other minerals, are retained. It contains almost five times the fibre of white rice and takes longer to digest, keeping one’s blood sugar levels stable over a longer period.  Red rice  Contains a variety of anthocyanins that gives its bran a red or maroon colour. It has a similar amount of fibre as brown rice, but six times the amount of zinc.  Parboiled rice Also called converted rice, this type of rice has a lower GI (40) and a firmer and less sticky texture than regular white rice. It is also more nutritious because its processing method — pressure-steamed and dried — forces the nutrients and vitamins (fibre, B-vitamins and minerals) from the husk into the starch granule.  Black rice Its black-coloured bran layer comes from a unique anthocyanin combination, which causes the rice to turn a deep purple colour when cooked. It contains about three times the fibre of brown rice. Wild rice Not a true rice, but comes from a wild North American grain-producing grass. Compared to brown rice, it contains a similar amount of fibre but twice the amount of zinc and eight times the amount of Vitamin E. It requires the most water, soaking and cooking time among other rice types.   GI of rice varieties: High (70-100): white rice, sticky (glutinous), puffed rice  Medium (56-69): brown rice, basmati rice  Low: parboiled (converted) rice (around 40)
  • Commerce minister says geographical indication bill to be passed soon

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    Commerce minister says geographical indication bill to be passed soon
      LAHORE: Ministry of commerce is aggressively working to get the draft geographical bill passed in order to protect local brands and fetch fair prices of products in the international market, a minister said on Tuesday. Commerce minister Khurram Dastgir Khan, at a meeting of the Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (Reap), said the ministry is working on geographical indication law, “and it will soon be implemented.” Khan acknowledged the problems related to brand recognition raised by the Reap office bearers. “Half of the subsidy is available for those rice exporters who are exporting their rice under their brand names.” State-owned Intellectual Property Organisation Pakistan drafted Geographical Indication Bill 2016 to protect the products, originating from a specific area, whose quality or reputation is attributable to its place of origin. Currently, geographical indications are being protected under collective mark system of Trademark Ordinance, 2001. Industry experts said an effective local law is imperative to protect the GI interests of indigenous products. They said India has managed to place GI logos on its more than 200 products, which mean that they belong to the country and which also entail good prices in the international market. “Unfortunately, not a single product in Pakistan has a GI logo despite the country boasts of Sindhi Ajrak, Multani Halwa and a variety of mangoes,” an expert said.  Ironically, the most popular rice variety is cultivated on fields in India and Pakistan in a very close proximity. Pakistani basmati growers have been strenuously fighting at an Indian court in order to protect their geographical indication against infringements in aromatic rice since 2004.  GI tag protects the legal rights of agricultural, manufactured and natural goods in a specific geographical territory, according to the World Trade Organization. That means the rice produced in areas other than the specified cannot be called Basmati. Mahmood Baqi Moulvi, chairman of Reap said rice is the second biggest exportable commodity in Pakistan. “Despite earning around two billion dollars in valuable foreign exchange annually, rice exporters are not given the benefits, which are available for textile, leather, carpet, sports goods and surgical instruments sectors,” Moulvi said. ”We have already written letters to Finance Minister as well as to your esteemed office to include rice export sector in zero-rated exporting sectors and exempt rice exports from sales and income tax on utilities.” Reap chairman said rice exporters have been facing unprecedented challenges for years and, “consequently, their capacity has severely been impaired.”   “For the international marketing of rice and to get high price of the commodity, it is necessary for rice exporters to establish their own brands,” he added. “Rice export from Pakistan is generally affected due to improper branding, poor packing and non-compliance to sanitary and phytosanitary measures.” The State Bank of Pakistan granted relaxation in payback time by three months to rice exporters owing to decline in exports. “We request to the ministry of commerce to extend the relaxation payback period for another three months and withhold imposing more penalties on rice exporters,” Moulvi said. Rice exports fell 18 percent to $713 million in the first half of the current fiscal year, according to the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics.