Relax EU norms, rice exporters urge Centre

  • Relax EU norms, rice exporters urge Centre Tribune News Service Karnal, October 25 Members of All India Rice Exporters’ Association (AIREA) met Union Minister of Commerce and Industry Suresh Prabhu in Delhi yesterday to protest European Union’s decision to fix maximum residue limit (MRL) of tricyclazole in rice export to 0.01 ppm (parts per million) from 1ppm.Vijay Setia, president, AIREA, said a delegation comprising members of the association had met the Union Minister and officials of the Agriculture Ministry to discuss the criteria fixed by the EU on export of rice. He said the government had raised the issue with the EU and assured to provide them relief.Tricyclazole is a chemical used for treating rice in India. Members of the association said it was difficult to meet the January 1 deadline fixed by the EU to cut MRL level.They demanded the Union Minister to seek one-year relaxation from the EU as paddy crop had already arrived in the market.The exporters are worried as the new criteria may hit export of 3.5 lakh tonne PUSA Basmati-1 and PUSA Basmati-1401 variety to the EU.Setia said more and more workshops would be held at the village level to educate farmers on the use of chemical for treating the crop.He said tricyclazole was a chemical used to save the plant from leaf and neck blast, but the farmers were using it haphazardly resulting in the EU imposing stricter norms.Setia said around 250 rice exporters have been exporting rice treated with tricyclazole to the EU for the past several years without any complaint regarding its quality. “We have also requested the company to clear its point of view to the EU, which is also doing the same,” he said.
  • All India Rice Exporters’ Association seeks PM’s intervention to revoke EU ban on basmati rice

  • All India Rice Exporters’ Association seeks PM’s intervention to revoke EU ban on basmati rice
    EU has issued a notification that residues above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed in the basmati imports after Dec 31, 2017.
    The Dollar Business Bureau  India’s widely appreciated basmati rice may face the closed doors of the EU due to the new regulations that EU has imposed on chemical residues, The All India Rice Exporters Association (AIREA) said on Wednesday. A fungicide named tricyclazole which many farmers use to prevent leaf and neck blast in basmati paddy varieties was banned by EU. For sometime EU had allowed a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 1ppm (parts per million) on the basmati rice that was exported to EU. However, it has issued a notification that residues above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed in the basmati imports after Dec 31, 2017.  Speaking to the media, AIREA President, Vijay Setia said it would not only impact their businesses but also affect the price realisation of about 1.5 million basmati rice growing farmers in India. Presently US and Japan allow basmati rice imports having residues of up to 3ppm  and 10ppm respectively.  The Rice Exporters’ Association President added that while many farmers do not use the chemical much, asking them to change their practices may take around 2 years and if the new rules by the EU are not withdrawn, the Indian farmers could stand to lose their business to Pakistan.  Incidentally, basmati rice grown in Pakistan do not need the use of the chemical fungicide that Indian farmers use and hence stand to gain from the ban on the Indian exports.  India exports 4 million tonnes of basmati rice every year which s valued around Rs 22,000 crore. The country exports 350,000 tonnes of basmati to EU which is valued around Rs 1700 crore. The AIREA has appealed to the Prime Minister to intervene and has also engaged in discussions with the Commerce Ministry to find a way out of the issue.  In a statement to the media,  AIREA said, ‘Pakistan being the other Basmati rice exporter to the EU would gain all the business that India would lose... the effect of this virtual ban would thus be ruinous.’ According to a PTI release, an Indian government delegation is scheduled to visit Brussels on July 12 in order to discuss the new regulations.
  • Basmati rice exporters cry foul over EU regulations on chemical residues

  • India’s exports of the Basmati rice to the European Union might come to a halt due to new regulations on chemical residues Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint New Delhi: India’s exports of the aromatic Basmati rice to the European Union might come to a halt due to new regulations on chemical residues, the All India Rice Exporters Association said on Wednesday. The bone of contention is a fungicide named Tricyclazole developed by Dow Agri Sciences which farmers use to prevent leaf and neck blast in Basmati paddy varieties. While the European Union (EU) has so far allowed a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 1 ppm (parts per million), after 31 December 2017 it has mandated that imports having an MRL above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed. “This will not only impact our businesses but also affect price realisation of about 1.5 million farmers growing Basmati in India,” the association’s president Vijay Setia said. Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. The fungicide Tricyclazole is commonly used by farmers in India to prevent blast in Basmati varieties like PB1 and Pusa 1410. “While there is a problem that farmers do not judiciously use the chemical, changing practices requires as much as two years,” Setia said, adding, “if the new rules are not withdrawn we will lose our business to Pakistan.” Basmati varieties grown in Pakistan do not require use of the fungicide and stand to gain from the de-facto ban on Indian exports. India exports over 4 million tonnes of Basmati rice every year valued at over Rs22,000 crore. Exports to the EU currently are at 350,000 tonnes per year, valued at over Rs1,700 crore. The rice exporters association has written to the Prime Minister to intervene and engaged with the commerce and agriculture ministries on the issue. “Pakistan being the other Basmati rice exporter to the EU would gain all the business that India would lose... the effect of this virtual ban would thus be ruinous,” the statement added. According to a Press Trust of India report, an Indian government delegation is scheduled to visit Brussels in Belgium on 12 July to discuss the new regulations.
  • EU extends deadline on fungicide in rice

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    Wed, 31 May 2017
     
    The European Commission has extended the deadline for Cambodian producers of white rice to effectively eliminate the use of the fungicide Tricyclazole in their exports to the EU, the Cambodia Rice Federation said yesterday. Producers of white rice will have until September to meet the revised threshold level of 0.01 milligrams of Tricyclazole residue per kilo of rice, far below the current limit of 1 milligram per kilo, it said. The previous deadline for white rice exports was June, while the December deadline for jasmine rice exports remains unchanged.