Farmers warned against basmati rot

  • Farmers warned against basmati rot Experts from Punjab Agricultural University have cautioned farmers against the blast (problem caused due to fungus) and foot rot diseases in basmati. A Tribune photograph Tribune News Service Ludhiana, July 7 The experts of Plant Pathology Department, Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), have cautioned the farmers of Punjab against the blast and foot rot diseases of basmati.Expressing their concern over these serious diseases, they urged the farmers to follow timely management practices, which if not adopted can cause significant yield losses.The Head, Department of Plant Pathology, Dr Parvinder Singh Sekhon, advised the farmers to not cultivate susceptible un-recommended varieties such as Pusa 1401, Mushal etc. He said farmers should apply only recommended dose of nitrogen fertiliser as blast increases with high dose of nitrogen, he observed.Dr Sekhon also stressed upon the farmers to not grow basmati in those fields where blast during last year. Instead of basmati, cultivate rice varieties, he suggested. The right time of application of recommended fungicides such as Amistar Top or Indofil Z-78 is boot stage of the crop, he said.Dr Sekhon urged the farmers to not adopt late sprays which are not effective and also pose a problem of residue in grains. The residue of un-recommended fungicides in grain lots also creates hurdles for export of basmati, he added. With respect to foot rot in basmati, Dr Sekhon said the disease spreads through the seed and infected seedling in the nursery. So, seed treatment as well as seed root dip treatment in solution of Bavistin (0.2 %) for six hours is very effective to check this disease, he advised. Former Prof nominated Dr JS Bal, former Prof, Department of Fruit Science, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, has been nominated as a member of the scientific committee of the IV International Jujube (Ber) Symposium, under the aegis of the 30th International Horticultural Congress (IHC), organised by the International Society of Horticultural Science to be held at Istanbul, Turkey, from August 12 to 16, 2018.A 10-member committee has been constituted by the IHC 2018 to conduct the IV International Jujube Symposium. Bal has been inducted as the third senior most member of the committee which includes two scientists each from China and India and one each from USA, Australia, Romania, Italy, Turkey and Kuwait.Experts discuss effective delivery of knowledge to farmersPunjab Agricultural Management and Extension Training Institute (PAMETI) organised a training programme on ‘Information and communication technologies (ICT) for effective knowledge delivery’ from July 3 to 7, in which 27 members of Agriculture Departments, Agricultural Technology Management Agency and the PAU participated.During the inaugural session, Dr H S Dhaliwal, Director PAMETI, said there was lack of extension staff as compared to the number of farmers they were supposed to address. So, there was a need to use the information technology for reaching out to more farmers in less time.Bharti Madan, Deputy Director (IT), PAMETI, introduced the concept of knowledge management and how information & communication technologies (ICTs) can help in the management process. She said Agricultural Knowledge Management was the process of retrieving, gathering, understanding, organising, sharing and effectively using the agricultural knowledge.
  • All India Rice Exporters’ Association seeks PM’s intervention to revoke EU ban on basmati rice

  • All India Rice Exporters’ Association seeks PM’s intervention to revoke EU ban on basmati rice
    EU has issued a notification that residues above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed in the basmati imports after Dec 31, 2017.
    The Dollar Business Bureau  India’s widely appreciated basmati rice may face the closed doors of the EU due to the new regulations that EU has imposed on chemical residues, The All India Rice Exporters Association (AIREA) said on Wednesday. A fungicide named tricyclazole which many farmers use to prevent leaf and neck blast in basmati paddy varieties was banned by EU. For sometime EU had allowed a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 1ppm (parts per million) on the basmati rice that was exported to EU. However, it has issued a notification that residues above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed in the basmati imports after Dec 31, 2017.  Speaking to the media, AIREA President, Vijay Setia said it would not only impact their businesses but also affect the price realisation of about 1.5 million basmati rice growing farmers in India. Presently US and Japan allow basmati rice imports having residues of up to 3ppm  and 10ppm respectively.  The Rice Exporters’ Association President added that while many farmers do not use the chemical much, asking them to change their practices may take around 2 years and if the new rules by the EU are not withdrawn, the Indian farmers could stand to lose their business to Pakistan.  Incidentally, basmati rice grown in Pakistan do not need the use of the chemical fungicide that Indian farmers use and hence stand to gain from the ban on the Indian exports.  India exports 4 million tonnes of basmati rice every year which s valued around Rs 22,000 crore. The country exports 350,000 tonnes of basmati to EU which is valued around Rs 1700 crore. The AIREA has appealed to the Prime Minister to intervene and has also engaged in discussions with the Commerce Ministry to find a way out of the issue.  In a statement to the media,  AIREA said, ‘Pakistan being the other Basmati rice exporter to the EU would gain all the business that India would lose... the effect of this virtual ban would thus be ruinous.’ According to a PTI release, an Indian government delegation is scheduled to visit Brussels on July 12 in order to discuss the new regulations.
  • Basmati exporters unhappy over EU’s norms on chemical residues

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    India Infoline News Service | Mumbai | July 06, 2017 14:17 IST

    Basmati rice exports from India to the European Union (EU) might come to an end owing to latest norms on chemical residues, stated All India Rice Exporters Association, as reported by a leading national news agency.

    European Union (EU) has permitted a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 1 ppm (parts per million) so far, However, from December 31, 2017 onwards it has instructed that imports having an MRL more than 0.01 ppm will not be allowed.   Rice stocks like LT Foods and KRBL Limited were in focus during Thursday’s trading session. KRBL Limited was trading higher by 1.36% at Rs 394.25 per share and LT Foods Limited was trading higher by 0.52% at Rs 67.1 per share as of 1404 hours on Thursday.

  • Basmati rice exporters cry foul over EU regulations on chemical residues

  • India’s exports of the Basmati rice to the European Union might come to a halt due to new regulations on chemical residues Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint New Delhi: India’s exports of the aromatic Basmati rice to the European Union might come to a halt due to new regulations on chemical residues, the All India Rice Exporters Association said on Wednesday. The bone of contention is a fungicide named Tricyclazole developed by Dow Agri Sciences which farmers use to prevent leaf and neck blast in Basmati paddy varieties. While the European Union (EU) has so far allowed a maximum residue limit (MRL) of 1 ppm (parts per million), after 31 December 2017 it has mandated that imports having an MRL above 0.01 ppm will not be allowed. “This will not only impact our businesses but also affect price realisation of about 1.5 million farmers growing Basmati in India,” the association’s president Vijay Setia said. Currently, the US and Japan allow Basmati imports with residues of up to 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. The fungicide Tricyclazole is commonly used by farmers in India to prevent blast in Basmati varieties like PB1 and Pusa 1410. “While there is a problem that farmers do not judiciously use the chemical, changing practices requires as much as two years,” Setia said, adding, “if the new rules are not withdrawn we will lose our business to Pakistan.” Basmati varieties grown in Pakistan do not require use of the fungicide and stand to gain from the de-facto ban on Indian exports. India exports over 4 million tonnes of Basmati rice every year valued at over Rs22,000 crore. Exports to the EU currently are at 350,000 tonnes per year, valued at over Rs1,700 crore. The rice exporters association has written to the Prime Minister to intervene and engaged with the commerce and agriculture ministries on the issue. “Pakistan being the other Basmati rice exporter to the EU would gain all the business that India would lose... the effect of this virtual ban would thus be ruinous,” the statement added. According to a Press Trust of India report, an Indian government delegation is scheduled to visit Brussels in Belgium on 12 July to discuss the new regulations.
  • Grains: The wholesale grains market remained weak

  • The wholesale grains market remained weak for the second straight week with prices of wheat and rice basmati sliding further on reduced offtake by flour mills and stockists against adequate stocks position. However, barley moved up on pick up in demand from consuming industries. Traders said reduced offtake by flour mills against sufficient stocks position on persistent supplies from producing regions put pressure on wheat prices. Muted demand weighed on rice basmati prices, they said. In the national capital, wheat dara (for mills) eased by Rs 5 to Rs 1,730-1,735 per quintal. Atta chakki delivery followed suit and traded lower by a similar margin to Rs 1,735-1,740 per 90 kg. In the rice section, rice basmati common and Pusa-1121 variety also dropped to Rs 7,100-7,200 and Rs 5,800-6,400 from previous levels of Rs 7,400-7,500 and Rs 6,000-6,800 per quintal. On the other hand, other bold grains, barley went up to Rs 1,600-1,620 from previous level of Rs 1,565-1,585 per quintal.(MORE) (This article has not been edited by DNA's editorial team and is auto-generated from an agency feed.)
  • EU’s stringent norms to hit basmati rice exports

  • The European Union’s stringent norms bringing down tolerance level for tricyclazole in basmati rice imports are likely to severely hit exports of grains from India. Tricyclazole is a fungicide used to protect the crop from a disease called ‘blast’.

     
    India is the leading exporter of the basmati rice in the global market. (PTI)
     
    The European Union’s stringent norms bringing down tolerance level for tricyclazole in basmati rice imports are likely to severely hit exports of grains from India. Tricyclazole is a fungicide used to protect the crop from a disease called ‘blast’. The EU may bring down the Maximum Residue Limit for tricyclazole to the default level of 0.01 parts per million. Currently, the level approved by the EU is 1 parts per million and level in Indian consignments are much lower. “We are trying to convince EU… even the current level of tricyclazole do not pose threat for consumer’s health and the level is much lower than 1 parts per million,” a senior government official said. India is the leading exporter of the basmati rice in the global market. The country exported 4.05 million tonne of basmati rice worth `22,727 crore during 2015-16. Of the total exports, around 0.38 million tonne worth `1,930 crore were to EU, according to the data from the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority.
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    India exported 2.92 million tonne of basmati rice during April-December in the current financial year, out of which 0.26 million tonne were shipped to EU, the data showed. “95% of the exports would be affected… but we are trying our best so that we can get extension,” a leading exporter said.
    The EU is likely to make an announcement regarding this in July. Usually, the norm becomes applicable after six months of the announcement. “For basmati rice, we have got a margin up to a year. So, by the end of calendar year 2018, we can export… we are talking to the members of the EU bloc” the exporter said. Some officials, however, believe that basmati rice exports to EU would not be affected. “Basmati rice exports to EU would not be down… its just that the cost of testing would increase…The level of tricyclozone varies, its not the same,” an official with APEDA said. India accounts for over 70% of the world’s basmati rice production. Basmati rice constitutes a small portion of the total rice produced in India.
  • Basmati exports to EU face fungicide blockade

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    •  NEW DELHI, MARCH 1:  
    India’s basmati exports to the European Union (EU) could be significantly hit if the bloc implements a proposal to bring down the tolerance level for tricyclazole, a chemical used in India to treat rice. New Delhi is trying to convince the EU not to go ahead with the “unnecessary” safety precaution, as it argues that it has been scientifically proved that present levels do not pose a threat to consumers, a government official said. “The EU plans to bring down the MRL (Maximum Residue Limit) for tricyclazole to the default level of 0.01 ppm (parts per million), which could prove to be disastrous for Indian exports of basmati. But it is supposed to happen only in 2018, so we have time to convince them not to implement the change,” the official told BusinessLine. EU initiative India is in talks separately with European countries, such as Italy and Portugal, which do not support the EU initiative of raising the tolerance limit to put pressure on the bloc not to go ahead with its plan, the official added. The MRL for tricyclazole, a fungicide used by rice-growing countries to protect the crop from a disease called ‘blast’, is at present fixed at 1 ppm by the EU. This level does not prove to be a problem for Indian exports at the moment, as levels detected in Indian basmati consignments are much lower. Export of basmati However, if the MRL is brought down to 0.01 ppm, as indicated by the EU, a large part of India’s $3 billion export of basmati to Europe could be affected. Rice exporters from India are preparing for the worst by arranging for pre-testing of shipments, but are hopeful that the EU will change its mind, said Rajen Sundaresan from the All India Rice Exporters Association. “I believe that the matter will be sorted out favourably, as it is not just Indian exports that are at stake. Even rice growers in EU countries such as Italy and Spain use the fungicide,” said Sundaresan. Dow Agro Sciences, the owner of the molecule used in the fungicide, has already submitted scientific and technical evidence to the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2011 supporting a tricyclazole tolerance level of 3.0 ppm in rice.
     
  • Basmati rice exports delayed due to resumption of imports by Iran, says ICRA

  • Delay in resumption of imports by Iran is likely to hinder the recovery in Indian Basmati rice exports, says credit rating agency, ICRA, in its latest update note on Indian Basmati rice industry.

    New Delhi [India], Feb. 18 (ANI): Delay in resumption of imports by Iran is likely to hinder the recovery in Indian Basmati rice exports, says credit rating agency, ICRA, in its latest update note on Indian Basmati rice industry. ICRA has estimated this as a temporary delay, considering Iran’s insufficient domestic rice production and depleting inventory levels to meet its demand. In ICRA’s view, the price cap of USD 850 per metric tonne (MT) could pose further hurdles for the Basmati rice industry; given that during the current procurement season average Basmati paddy prices have been higher by 20-25 percent. Thus an inflow of orders from Iran, even after the import ban is lifted, remains to be seen. “Iran is a major export destination for Indian Basmati rice and decline in demand from Iran has played a role in the declining realisations of exports from India – from USD 1298/MT in FY2014 to USD 784/MT in FY2017,” said Deepak Jotwani, Assistant VP, ICRA Ltd. Iran is amongst the major importers of Basmati rice from India. However, over the years, the Iranian Government has imposed a ban on import of Basmati rice from time to time, as per the movement in inventory held by its rice traders and also to safeguard the interests of its local farmers. Iran last imposed a ban on import of Basmati rice in July 2016. Given that the ban persisted against industry expectations, the Government of India sent a trade delegation to Iran in January 2017 to resolve the issue. Following this, it was expected that the import ban would be removed soon. While there has been no official notification from Iran, a group of large Basmati rice importers in Iran have recently capped the price of Basmati rice imports at USD 850/MT. In another adverse development for the industry, the US has recently imposed fresh trade sanctions on Iran, which restrains Iran’s use of the US dollar for trade. These two developments have created uncertainty around the resumption of Basmati rice exports to Iran. While Basmati rice is consumed across the globe, West Asian countries continue to account for most of the imports (75 percent of Indian Basmati rice exports in FY2016). Within West Asia, Iran and Saudi Arabia are the two largest buyers, together accounting for 40 to 50 percent of total Basmati rice exports from India. In the past, Iran had been placed under economic sanctions by the USA, Europe and the United Nations, following which the Government of India implemented the rupee payment mechanism through UCO Bank to facilitate trade between India and Iran. This led to a surge in Indian Basmati rice exports to Iran (primarily Pusa 1121 variety) over FY2013 and FY2014 and it emerged as the largest importer (37 percent) of Basmati rice from India. However since then, exports to Iran have largely been on a downward trajectory owing to the import bans imposed. This has reflected in declining export realisations for the last few years. (ANI) This is published unedited from the ANI feed.
  • Currency crisis in Iran hits India’s basmati rice exports

  • Uncertainty over use of currency for bilateral trade has impacted India’s basmati rice exports to Iran following hesitation over the use of the dollar after fresh sanctions levied by the United States on the Islamic country. US president Donald Trump levied sanctions on 13 Iranian individuals and 12 entities for their support to that country's administration in connection with the test of a non-nuclear ballistic missile last month. According to trade sources, the Iranian government is reluctant to use the dollar for bilateral trade with friendly countries, including India. Since India has already cleared its oil dues in dollars, Iran lacks rupee-denominated currencies in its foreign currency reserves, casting a cloud uncertainty over India’s basmati rice exports to that country.
    Trade sources believe that Iran is looking to replace the dollar with the euro. However, nothing has been finalised yet, and till a decision is taken, India’s basmati exports to Iran may not resume. Shipment for old contracts, however, will continue. “India had a bilateral understanding with Iran for settlement of oil purchases in rupees. In fact, India cleared all dues arising from crude oil purchases in dollars. Hence, rupee reserves (in Iran) have been exhausted. Interestingly, Iran is reluctant to use the dollar for bilateral trade in response to US sanctions on it. The Iranian administration has also not taken any final decision on the use of any alternative currency. Hence, there is uncertainty over India’s basmati rice exports to that country. Until, the dilemma over the use of currency recedes, India’s basmati rice exports to Iran are unlikely to resume,” said Gurnam Arora, Joint Managing Director, Kohinoor Foods Ltd, producer and exporter of Kohinoor brand basmati rice. Meanwhile, a group of over six to eight importers in Iran has set $850 a tonne as the maximum import price of Indian basmati, which exporters based here find unviable due to a sharp increase in the prices over the past four months. They seek a minimum $925–950 a tonne. A senior Apeda (Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority) official said the Iranian government hasn't set any price for Indian basmati. “The currency issue can be dealt with bilaterally (between buyers and sellers) through use of alternative denominations like euro, yen and rupee. So, our request to exporters is not to sell basmati rice at a loss. They should wait till a clear price signal is received from the market,” a senior industry official said. Meanwhile, the price of the benchmark basmati rice in the wholesale market near New Delhi jumped by 50 per cent to trade at Rs 72 a kg currently from Rs 48 a kg on October 1, 2016. Indian exporters, therefore, seek a similar increase in realisation from basmati exports to Iran. In the last two tenders, the average realisation works out to $650-700 a tonne. “Iran’s move to put a cap is a result of a cartel of importers there. However, Iran has also reduced duty on basmati rice to 26 per cent from 40 per cent to ensure that its countrymen get rice at lower cost. Pakistan will derive some advantage from this as their logistic cost is lower due to proximity with Iran,” said Rajiv Tevtiya, Managing Director, RML AgTech, a Mumbai-based agri-technology and advisory firm. Meanwhile, data compiled by Apeda showed India’s basmati rice exports at 2.9 million tonnes between April–December 2016, 0.1 million tonnes lower than the same period the previous year. Exports, however, are likely to pick up and touch last financial year’s level of 4 million tonnes by March 2017, said an Apeda official. Of about one million tonnes of annual imports, Iran has purchased nearly 0.5 million tonnes from India between April–December 2016.