Việt Nam to be among largest rice producers: FAO

  • Việt Nam is expected to be the world’s fifth largest rice producer in 2017. — Photo cafef.vn   Viet Nam News HÀ NỘI — Việt Nam is expected to be the world’s fifth largest rice producer in 2017, according to the Crop Prospects and Food Situation report released by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). FAO forecast that the biggest rice producer this year will be China with 142.3 million tonnes, followed by India with 110.4 million tonnes, Indonesia and Bangladesh. The report said the global rice output was likely to increase by 0.7 per cent to 502.3 million tonnes, thanks to production facilitation policies in Asia and yield recovery in South America and Australia. After two years of decrease, global rice exports are predicted to expand by 5 per cent in 2017 to 44.2 million tonnes, when compared with 43.6 million tonnes in the previous year, with India expected to remain the largest rice exporter. The organisation said global rice prices have been stabilised since early 2017 due to the increasing demand and currency reforms in India and Thailand. — VNS Read more at http://vietnamnews.vn/bizhub/378408/viet-nam-to-be-among-largest-rice-producers-fao.html#ZbZUhAsWIjHDD37E.99
  • FAO and IRRI Combine Forces to Combat Rice Insecurity

  • A new agreement to promote sustainable agriculture in developing countries was signed by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). The organizations will share scientific and technical knowledge, promote capacity building activities, and assist in government strategizing, with an emphasis on benefiting small-scale farmers and women.

    “With over 3 billion people across the globe eating rice every day, rice is critical to global food security,” said Maria Helena Semedo, FAO Deputy Director-General. “Ensuring sustainable rice production is a key contribution to the global goal of ending hunger. By teaming up with IRRI, already a long-standing partner, we will be able to scale up, complement and amplify our work towards reaching this goal.”

    The stated goals of the FAO are to eradicate hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition, eliminate poverty while promoting economic and social progress for all, and sustainably manage and use natural resources for the benefit of present and future generations. Currently, two major rice-related FAO efforts are underway. First is the Asia and Pacific’s Regional Rice Initiative, and second, the Partnership for Sustainable Rice Systems Development in Sub-Saharan Africa. These are sharing technology, agricultural and pest management practices, and strategies to increase rice resilience and production efficiency.

    “The world faces very significant changes over the next few decades to produce the volume and quality of nutritious food to feed a global population heading for 10 billion people,” said Matthew K. Morell, IRRI Director-General. “Addressing these issues relies on global partnerships, and today, IRRI is delighted to be reaffirming through this Memorandum of Agreement our commitment to work with FAO to enhance sustainable rice-based production and food systems through awareness raising, capacity development, knowledge exchange, and evidence-based analyses for policy support.”

    IRRI is a nonprofit research and educational institute founded by the Ford and Rockefeller foundations and the Philippine government in 1960. Its goals are to reduce poverty and hunger through rice science, improve rice farmer and consumer health and welfare, and ensure the environmental sustainability of rice production. Today, IRRI has offices in 17 countries and collaborates with a variety of research partners including the food security research partnership CGIAR. Working with the United Nations Environment, IRRI developed the Sustainable Rice Platform to promote resource efficiency, sustainability, and affordability through policy development and voluntary market transformation initiatives.

    By working together, the FAO and IRRI seek to increase availability and use of improved and adapted rice variety seeds. To increase nutrition and improve the income of small-scale farmers, they will develop and commercialize rice by-products. Through farmer field schools and other forms of outreach, they will better educate farmers in best-practices, including pest management. They will also work to improve working conditions for rice farmers and improve women participation and entrepreneurial opportunities.

  • FAO: Food Price Index dips again in April

  • wheat
    Updated forecasts point to weakening trade volumes and robust supply conditions for wheat and maize.
     
    ROME, ITALY — Global food commodity prices fell in April amid expectations of ongoing robust supplies of many key staples, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) food price index. The FAO Food Price Index averaged 168 points in April, down 1.8% from March although remaining 10% higher than a year earlier. The FAO Vegetable Oil Price Index fell 3.9% on the month, pushed down by weakening demand for palm oil and expectations of bumper soy harvests and plantings in South and North America. The FAO's Food Price Index is a trade-weighted index tracking international market prices of five major food commodity groups. The Cereal Price Index also shed 1.2% in April, pushed down by sagging wheat prices even as international rice prices firmed. The Dairy Price Index fell 3.3% as production in the northern hemisphere entered peak season, allying short-term sourcing concern. By contrast, the FAO Meat Price Index rose 1.7%, as pigmeat prices increased in response to strong domestic demand in the E.U. and increased sales to China. The FAO updated its global cereal production forecasts for 2017, which now point to a likely 0.4% annual decline from 2016 even as the pace of utilization grows by around 1%. The net result of the new projections, released today with the Cereal Supply and Demand Brief, would be a drop in the cereal stocks-to-use ratio in 2017-18 to 25.8%, still a comfortably high figure in historical terms but slightly below the current season's level, the FAO said. The new global cereal output forecast was raised from the April figures, as Brazil appears poised to enjoy stronger-than-expected maize yields, lifting the global output for that crop to 1.054 billion tonnes, the FAO said. Projected global rice output remained stable at 506 million tonnes, while the forecast for wheat — 740 million tonnes — was also unchanged as expected smaller crops in Australia, Canada, Russia and the United States are offset by likely expansions in the E.U., India and Morocco. On the consumption side in 2017-18, abundant maize and other coarse grains are expected to push up use for livestock in China and South America, while rice utilization is expected to grow 1.2% due to expanding food intake. Global inventories by the end of seasons in 2018 are forecast, as a result, to nearly match the levels at the opening of the year, although their composition is seen changing somewhat, the FAO said. Wheat stocks are set to expand by 3.3% to reach a new high of 247.6 million tonnes, driven mostly by China, which, on the other hand, is drawing down its accumulated coarse grain reserves by almost 20.5 million tonnes.
  • Over 3bn people eat rice daily – FAO

    IRRI and FAO step up joint efforts to globally bolster sustainable rice production

  • Focus is on food security and helping poor farmers by enhancing crop resilience and adapting to climate change.

    FAO and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) have agreed to cooperate more closely to support sustainable rice production in developing countries to improve food security and livelihoods while safeguarding natural resources.An agreement signed today seeks to better pool the scientific knowledge and technical know-how of the two organizations so that they can expand and intensify their work globally. The partnership primarily aims to enhance sustainable rice-based farming systems through capacity building activities - including assisting governments draw up and implement national and regional policies and strategies - to the benefit of small-scale farmers, especially women. “The world faces very significant changes over the next few decades to produce the volume and quality of nutritious food to feed a global population heading for 10 billion people,” said IRRI Director-General Matthew K. Morell. “Addressing these issues relies on global partnerships, and today, IRRI is delighted to be reaffirming through this Memorandum of Agreement our commitment to work with FAO to enhance sustainable rice-based production and food systems through awareness raising, capacity development, knowledge exchange, and evidence-based analyses for policy support.”
    The world faces very significant changes over the next few decades to produce the volume and quality of nutritious food to feed a global population heading for 10 billion people.

    Matthew K. Morell, director-general, International Rice Research Institute

     “With over three billion people across the globe eating rice every day, rice is critical to global food security,” said Maria Helena Semedo, FAO Deputy Director-General, Climate and Natural Resources. “Ensuring sustainable rice production is a key contribution to the global goal of ending hunger. By teaming up with IRRI, already a long-standing partner, we will be able to scale up, complement and amplify our work towards reaching this goal.”

    Making the rice value chain more sustainable

    In many countries around the world rice is a staple crop for food security and consumption trends are growing. At the same time rice production is vulnerable to the increasing impacts of climate change, including extreme weather events such as droughts and floods. Both FAO and IRRI are actively promoting more sustainable rice practices throughout the value chain - production, marketing and consumption - to optimise its nutritional properties and as a means of improving livelihoods and tackling poverty, particularly in rural areas.   
    FAO has developed the Regional Rice Initiative for Asia and Pacific which promotes enhanced crop resilience while increasing efficiency and farmers’ income.
    In Africa and in Latin America the UN agency is engaged in scientific and technical cooperation including the sharing of technologies and best practices to increase production and productivity, including reduction of post-harvest losses and improved grain quality. IRRI is engaged in strengthening capacities of all rice sector actors through its capacity development activities, including IRRI Education and the Sustainable Rice Platform. The Sustainable Rice Platform is a global alliance to promote resource efficiency and sustainability in trade flows, production and consumption operations, and supply chains in the global rice sector. The Sustainable Rice Platform recently established the world’s first standard for sustainable rice. Through the Sustainable Rice Platform, IRRI aims to use environmental and socio-economic benchmarks to maintain yields for rice smallholders, reduce the environmental footprint of rice cultivation and meet consumer needs for food safety and quality. At the same time, IRRI Education works to build capacity through-out IRRI’s extensive partnership network.

    Improving varieties, transferring knowledge

    FAO and IRRI will together assist rice producing countries to adopt improved and adapted rice varieties, enhance availability of certified seeds and also the transfer of knowledge - including on pest management - through participatory approaches such as farmer fields schools. The two organisations will also seek to strengthen partnerships for post-harvest handling, and help farmers and other rice producers add value by developing and marketing rice by-products rich in proteins and micronutrients, and explore the appropriate use of rice by-products to generate energy, animal feed and other agricultural products. In addition, FAO and IRRI will work together to ensure that women farmers can participate in viable, safe and dignified entrepreneurial opportunities in the rice value chain, and that there is an improvement in work conditions in the rice sector.